INMATE INGENUITY: The Cell Solace Collection

posted in: Exhibitions, News | 0

A Violence Transformed Exhibition INMATE INGENUITY: THE CELL SOLACE COLLECTION Containers made in U.S. Prisons The exhibition continues through October 21, 2018. We are pleased to present this exhibition featuring more than twenty exquisitely crafted containers made by inmates in American prisons and jails over the second and third quarters of the twentieth century.  Inmate Ingenuity is a Violence Transformed exhibition continuing the decade long collaboration between the NCAAA and the Violence Transformed project. It is partially supported by the Mayor’s Office for Arts and Culture, Josephine and Louise Crane Family Foundation, and Violence Transformed. Inmate Ingenuity presents a jewelry box, and many purses, hand and shoulder bags all completely made of folded woven cigarette cartons and paper. Surprising design sensitivities and remarkable artisan skills are evident in the sophisticated and well‐crafted containers many of which eventually found their way to specialized markets. The aggregation of these works make up the Cell Solace Collection. Others were gifted by the inmates to sweethearts, wives, family and friends on the outside. Many viewers, in addition to being awed by the beauty of the bags and boxes, will also recall the once universally familiar motifs on the cigarette packaging, such as the familiar camel associated with that brand name, or the prancing lion and crown on Pall Mall boxes.  Works on display evoke an era when smoking was widely accepted as a social norm, and before smoking was banned in US prisons.  At that time, cigarettes were prized commodities behind bars.  The availability of cigarette containers and endless time, combined with the introduction of purse weaving as a craft into the prisons allowed inmates a new arena of creativity and a humanizing opportunity to connect to the world beyond the incarceration. The Cell Solace Collection was assembled by Antonio N. Inniss who grew up in Roxbury and spent his formative years in Boston and Los Angeles pursuing an interest in music.  His father, whose friend Terrence was incarcerated at New York’s Rikers Island, unintentionally planted the seed for the collection when he received two of Terrence’s purses: One for Inniss’ mother and the other for Terrence’s girlfriend.  They fascinated young Inniss who shared his enthusiasm for them, and eventually found his family and friends giving him new bags that they encountered.  He thus became a collector and the bags and purses became his passion.  He increased his collecting activity during a period when he worked for Amtrak and travelled widely.  Inniss appreciated the discipline, hard work, creativity and inventiveness invested by inmates in producing the bags.  He said that … Continued

Refreshment

posted in: News | 0

The Museum’s Fall Season begins with the launch of a refreshed website. We’re still tweaking some features for your enjoyment. We look forward to being able to connect and interact with you in ways that will inform and educate.